Asian Dumpling Wrappers

Asian Dumpling Wrappers
(Courtesy: Yuhong Sun)

 

3 cups flour

1 cup water

 

Measure flour into a large mixing bowl.  Add water, a little at a time, mixing continuously, until it forms a dough and no flour is left in the bottom of the bowl.

Knead dough 300 times, patting with water occasionally if it begins to feel dry.  Cover and allow the dough to rest for 20 minutes.

Divide dough in half and roll each piece into 1” ropes.  Slice each rope into 30 pieces and shape into flat circles.

Thin each circle by rolling with a pin from the outside edge toward the center, turning the circle in 45° increments with your other hand, using a lightly floured surface if necessary, until it measures 4”-5” across.  This makes the wrapper thinner at the edges than in the middle, making it easier to neatly crimp the edges of the filled dumpling. It will also make the center of the wrapper stronger so it won’t leak during cooking.

Alternatively, you can roll the entire dough thinly (again using a lightly floured surface) and cut with a 5” round cutter.

Fill each wrapper with 1 tablespoon of Chinese dumpling filling. Wet the edge of the dumpling wrapper and press to close, making the entire edge is tightly sealed.**  For more in-depth instruction on rolling and pleating dumplings, check out this video!

Fill a large pot with water and bring to a very gentle simmer.  Add about 20 dumplings, making sure they are not crowded.  Each time the water begins to boil more rapidly, add cold water to bring it back to a gentle simmer.

When dumplings float to the top, they’re done, 3-4 minutes.

If preferred, dumplings can be cooked in the air fryer for 6 minutes.

**Dumplings are often served at gatherings and are traditionally assembled jointly by the group or family that are going to eat them. Try experimenting with different shapes and have fun putting them together with your guests!

 

60 dumpling wrappers, 25 calories per wrapper

Hack:  These wrappers can be used to make Wonton Soup or cut in 8” squares to make Vegetable Spring Rolls!

Hack:  A pasta roller can be used on the 6 or 7 setting to produce sheets of dough to cut for wrappers.

Hack:  For more instructional videos for making traditional Chinese cuisine at home, visit Yuhong’s Country Kitchen on YouTube!

 

 

Homemade Chinese Dumplings

Another authentic recipe from Yuhong’s Country Kitchen! These homemade Chinese dumplings can be prepared simmered, pan-fried or in an air fryer.

Homemade Chinese Dumplings
(Courtesy Yuhong Sun)

 

½ head green cabbage

½ head napa cabbage

8 green onions

1 oz ginger (4” knob, ¼ cup)

1 lb ground pork

2 eggs

1 tbsp sesame oil

1 tbsp red wine

2 tbsp soy sauce

2 tbsp olive oil

100 dumpling wrappers

 

Dipping Sauce (per serving)*

2 tbsp soy sauce

1 tbsp Chinese vinegar

1 tsp crushed ginger

1 tsp chili sauce

1½ tsp sugar

1½ tsp sesame oil

 

Finely chop the cabbages and place in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt and set aside. The salt will draw liquid out of the cabbage. Only a small amount of salt is needed.

Finely chop green onion and ginger. Set aside.

Place ground pork, eggs and ginger into a bowl and mix for 2 minutes.

Using your hands or cheesecloth, squeeze water out of cabbage and place into a clean bowl. Add green onions, pork mixture, sesame oil, red wine, soy sauce and olive oil. Mix together well.

Take one dumpling wrapper and place one tbsp filling in the center. Wet the edges of the wrapper with water and seal completely. The amount of filling and shape you fold it in is less important than ensuring that the edges are completely sealed so the filling doesn’t leak out. Continue until all the filling is gone.**  For more in-depth instruction on rolling and pleating dumplings, check out this video!

Put a large pot of water on the stove and heat to boiling. While the water is heating, assemble the dipping sauce.

When water comes to a full boil, add about 20 dumplings. Bring water back to a full boil and add enough cold water to bring the pot down to a gentle boil. Cover pot and cook dumplings until they float to the top of the water, about 3-4 minutes. Continue adding cold water as necessary throughout cooking to keep water at a gentle boil.

Remove dumplings from water with a slotted spoon and serve with dipping sauce.

If preferred, dumplings can be cooked in an air fryer for 6 minutes instead of boiling them.

*Because of the thin consistency of the dipping sauce, it’s often made in small bowls for each individual person or to share between two or three people.

**Dumplings are often served at gatherings and are traditionally assembled jointly by the group or family that are going to eat them. Try experimenting with different shapes and have fun putting them together with your guests!

 

10 servings, 270 calories per serving

Hack: Cooked or uncooked dumplings can be frozen for up to 3 months. Lay in a single layer on a cookie sheet, making sure the edges are not touching, and place in the freezer. Once they are frozen, package in freezer bags or containers for storage. Add 2 extra minutes to cooking time. As with fresh, frozen boiled dumplings are ready when they float to the top of the water.

Hack: Ask the produce clerk to cut a head of cabbage into wedges so you’ll only have to buy what you need. They’ll wrap the leftover pieces and put it back on the shelf for sale.

Hack: Leftover cabbage can be used to make this andouille and fried cabbage recipe or Chinese Chicken Cabbage Soup!

Hack: Hack: Do you know that you can freeze fresh ginger root? Grating it in it’s frozen state is easier than grating it fresh and, if you choose organic ginger, you don’t have to peel it! Simply place in a sealed freezer bag or container and pop it in the freezer.

Hack: Chop leftover green onions and freeze in a sealable freezer bag or container for future use. While they won’t retain the crispness that would make them suitable for salads or garnish, they will be fine for cooking.

Hack:  For instructional videos for making traditional Chinese cuisine, visit Yuhong’s Country Kitchen on YouTube!

 

 

Wonton Soup

Wonton Soup
(Courtesy Yuhong Sun)

 

Wontons:

½ lb pork

2 scallions, chopped

1 tsp fresh ginger, chopped

1 tsp cornstarch

1 tsp rice vinegar

½ teaspoon sesame oil

1 egg

40 wonton wrappers

6 cups water

Soup:

1 ½ cups vegetable broth

1 ½ cups water

1 tomato, chopped

 

Mix pork, scallions, ginger, cornstarch, vinegar, sesame oil and egg in a bowl.

Place 1 tsp mixture in the center of a wonton wrapper. Wet edges of wonton and fold to form a triangle shape. Seal edges. Press two corners of folded wonton together to form a hat and seal.

Bring six cups of water to a simmer in a large pot. Gently place 12 wontons into boiling water. Add 1/2 cold water and allow water to return to a simmer. Repeat simmer with another 1/2 cup cold water. When wontons float to the surface of the water (about 5 minutes), scoop from the pot and lay on a plate in a single layer.

In the meantime, mix broth and water in a pan. Add tomato and bring to simmer.

To serve, place one cup of soup in a bowl with 4 wontons.

3 servings, 475 calories per serving

Hack: Freeze remaining uncooked wontons in a single layer on a baking sheet. When solid, transfer to a freezer-safe container. Cook from a frozen state, allowing 2 extra minutes to cook. Any leftover wonton wrappers can be wrapped tightly and frozen as well.

Hack:  For more instructional videos for making traditional Chinese cuisine at home, visit Yuhong’s Country Kitchen on YouTube!